Cordless Led Work Light, JIRVY Portable Rechargeable COB Led Flashlight Super Bright 3W Flood Light Torch with Magnetic Stand for Car Repairing, Workshop, Garage, Camping, Emergency Lighting (Large)

I’d like to say I was completely satisfied with this light. A cordless work light is great thing to have whenever working on, especially under a car. The magnetic base holds onto any piece of steel. You can place the light where you want it and shed concentrated light where you need it. The cordless work light is especially good when welding. The self darkening welding helmet is tinted which makes it difficult to see in low light. This cordless work light sheds enough light on the project to clearly see with a automatic darkening welding helmet on, but it is not bright enough to darken the welding helmet.

The cordless work light is rechargeable via a common USB cord. It charges in a few hours and provides a good 3-4 hours of light. The end swivels, making it possible to direct light where you need it.


 

The problems with this light are, the unit has to be charged when it runs out of battery life. That means you are without the light for a few hours. The magnet holds onto steel surfaces, but is not as strong as it should be. The switch is a 3 position switch, hi, low, and a one cell light on the end. You have to press the button once to turn it on hi. To turn it off you have to press it again to go to low, again to turn on the little light on the end, and once more to turn the light off.

Harbor freight has a more expensive cordless work light that has a longer LED light bulb, a stronger magnet, and a switch that turns off in one click. The Harbor fright light is a better cordless work light, but is more expensive. This light makes a great backup light, and is worth the money, but should have been engineered a little more to be a great cordless work light. The Harbor Freight cordless work light also has a replaceable battery you can switch out in a minute. All you have to do is buy the 18605 batteries and a charger for them. It seems like quite and investment, but well worth it when you consider all the advantages. Like I said, this rechargeable light from Amazon is a great light to try for the price. If you find yourself using a cordless work light on a daily basis, check out the Harbor Freight model.

 

Electric Grinders

Which electric grinder is right for the job? This is more of an article on finding the right grinder for around the house, garage, and small shop. There are a variety of grinders available in a wide range of prices. Are the expensive electric grinders worth the price? When your income relies on your tools, the choice is obvious. Especially when those tools become a tax deduction. But what about around the house and for those weekend projects? We will look at a number of grinders, stones, cutoff wheels, wire wheels, and other attachments for electric grinders.

There are 2 basic sizes of electric grinders, larger 7 inch and smaller 4 ½ inch grinders. Grinders come in different speeds, have different attachment sizes, and offer different features. First we will look at the different sizes and some of the features.


 

Electric Grinder Sizes

Let’s start with the 4 ½ inch electric grinders. They are smaller, easier to handle, and have much higher RPM’s. That means they rotate at a much higher speed. There are advantages and disadvantages to higher speed. You have to match the stone or abrasive to the speed. Check stones, etc for speed ratings. The problem with a high speed grinder is, they can tear up a wire wheel in minutes. Not to mention, sending wires all over the place.

The 4 ½ high speed electric grinder come in speeds from about 7000 to 12,000 RPM. Slower speeds are normally found on cordless, battery operated models. There is a little trick to speed. There is an item called a Router Speed Control. You can buy one for under $20 and it will basically give you a 3 speed grinder. You can slow it down for wire wheels, and speed it up for rough stones. If they are rated for high speeds.

4 ½ electric grinders get into some restricted places. There are other choices for restricted areas we will discuss later. Prices vary, but consider how often you will be using to tool.

There is an advantage to economy electric grinders. You can purchase a few and set them up for different operations. Which saves time without having to change stones, wire wheels, etc, when moving from one task to another.

Harbor Freight offers a dependable 4 ½ inch electric grinder for well under $20. They last a long time, and with a good stone, have no trouble with just about anything you would grind. I’ve run a number of them through tests, and they are all still running.

Next up is the 7 inch grinders. Of course these are for larger jobs in open areas. They weigh more and are a bit more difficult to handle. Many 7 inch grinders come with a variable speed option. That can come in handy. The old tried and true Milwaukee 7 inch electric grinders and other brands seem to last forever. They are the choice of professionals as well as companies in many industries. The heavier they are, the more heavy duty they seem to be. Top brands also cost more, but will last the weekend user a life time. Again, check out on line ads and second hand stores for some real bargains. It seems this next generation has little or no interest in the tools dad or grandpa used. So lots of those old grinders wind up in second hand stores, or at the local junkyard. Small towns now have recycling centers where tools like these are taken out of the dumpsters and resold at very low prices. I’ve see it happen.


 

There are a number of other, smaller grinders, but to keep this article short, I will cover the majority of those in another article about pneumatic tools and grinders.

Dremel and other companies produce very small electric grinding tools. They are more along the hobby range. I don’t have a lot of experience with those, but if you want to add a comment about your favorite tools and grinders, be my guest.

One of the things I’ve noticed about those small electric grinders is they come with a cord, and are now offered as battery powered units. Look at the battery type to make sure it is the newer Lithium batteries, and not the older type that last maybe a year or so.

Grinder Speeds

Many 7 inch electric grinders come with variable speed controls ranging from very slow speeds to up over 8000 RPMs. 4 ½ inch grinders usually begin at about 10,000 RPMs and may go well over 12,000 RPMs. Does speed matter? In a sense it does. For one thing, you have to purchase and install a stone or other implement on the tool that exceeds the speed rating on the grinder. In other words, make sure your stone, wheel, or whatever you put on the grinder is rated for the maximum speed of the unit.

That brings us up to another issue, wire wheels. Wire wheels also have speed ratings. The faster a wire wheel rotates, the faster the wire breaks, is pulled off the wheel or cup, and wears down. Try and use wire wheels at slower speeds. Variable speed 7 inch grinders are best. If you use a wire wheel on a 4 ½ inch grinder, consider buying and using a speed control unit.


 

Amps

Amperage is a measure of the tool’s power, The higher the amperage, the more powerful the tool is. Amperage is also an indication of quality, and how long the tool will last. Higher amps can be a better buy, but do you need the maximum about of amps available? At times you need the power. A good stone will do the job, and you really don’t need to bear down on a grinder to get the job done. Let to stone or wheel do the work for you.

Stones

There are a variety of grinding stones and wheels to do a number of tasks. Rough stones are used to grind welds. Welded material is much stronger and harder than most normal metals. Stones come in different shapes and sizes. Thin wheels known as cut off wheels are used for cutting material as well as cutting through welds. Flat wheel are used for larger areas. Make sure the speed ratings on wheels and stones exceeds the maximum speed of the grinder you are using.

The main feature of stones and other attachments you need to pay attention to is the attachment point. 5/8-11 thread is the most popular for 7 inch grinders. Some grinders may come with a metric thread. Make sure the attachments you buy match the thread on your machine.

There are also open or non threaded attachments that use a large flat nut tightened by using a spanner wrench supplied with the grinder. Some wheels are universal fit. Check out all the features. And if you shop on line, read the reviews. You can tell a professional review from a backyard review in seconds. Not all wheels are created equal. Especially wire wheels. Some wire wheels have very good steel that will last a long time. Other wire wheels use cheap steel that shreds the first time you use it. Check the wire diameter. More expensive wire wheels and cups use a thicker wire. You don’t want to buy a wire cup, get half way through the job to find out, the wires are all over the floor. The last thing you want to do is track those wires all over the carpeting in the house. You know when you are going to find them. When you are walking around barefoot. And keep on mind, those wires can and will lodge themselves on your pet’s paws.

Cutoff Wheels

Cutoff wheels have their uses. Mostly for cutting off small object, cutting through rusted bolts, and cutting off welds. Cutoff wheels come in different diameters and thicknesses. Once again check the speed ratings. Also check the write ups on cutoff wheels to make sure they are designed for the material you will be cutting through.


 

Variable Speed

I can’t find a 4 ½ inch variable speed electric grinder. There are pneumatic die grinders and other grinders available I will cover at a later time. 7 inch grinder are available with built in variable speed control that comes in handy. Many of those are combination grinders/polishers. I’ve had a lot of luck with the lower priced Harbor Freight model. I also tried the router speed control that seems to work as a three speed control switch. Harbor Freight offers an extended warranty, but do you really need that if you plan on using it 2-3 times a year?

Safety

I can’t cover all the safety warnings here, but read the manual that comes with the machine. Here are a few common sense ideas you should follow.

Clean and double check your work area to make sure you are not going to bump into or get tangled up in anything. Especially the cord. Know where your cord is an how you plan on moving the grinder before you begin. Also look at where the sparks will be flying.

Wear eye protection, That us a given. Check out the full face masks available. Check the ratings on all eye protection gear.

Wear leather gloves. The newer gloves made from nylon will melt when sparks fly in them. By the time you are done you will have a nylon glove full of holes.

Clean up the floor and work area. You don’t want to be dragging grinder dust through the house or have children or pets walking through it.

Always be safe, take your time, and be safety conscience.

As always, if anyone has a copyright conflict, contact me on the DCMA Notice on top and I will take that information down.

Discount Tools

 

Some people are afraid to buy discount tools, thinking they are cheap, will not last, and will break at the worst time. I’m sure other people had that experience. Buy a discount tool socket set that looks nice in the case, but the socket shattered the first time you use it. That was a cheap tool. But there are other options, and some of them may surprise you.

I use a lot of tools to do a variety of jobs. I’ve fixed or replaced just about every part on a car, and restored a number of cars. I own a lot of quality tools, and at times, it does not pay to skimp on tools that really matter. I used to custom paint cars and would not give up my Binks spray guns for anything. I’ve used other brands for primer guns, but they were also top quality like Devilbiss. On the other hand, I did buy a cheap $15 touch up, or jam gun that was as good as my Binks Model 115 touch up gun. Then there is always painting under the car, like the frame where a cheaper spray gun would be fine. But to paint a custom car, would you spray a hood with nothing less than a top quality spray gun?

Then there are hand tools like sockets, wrenches, and other associated tools. I’ve been rather lucky with some off brands. One of my favorite places to shop is Harbor Freight. More on them later.

My first set of hand tools was a Craftsman set from Sears. They were good quality tools. I’ve owned them over 30 years. My dad owned Craftsmen tools. My brothers bought Craftsman tools from Sears. They are all still reliable. All together, we have not had to return more than a half dozen tools on their life time warranty. That is pretty good

Although the Craftsman tool set I purchased 30 years ago is a fairly complete set of hand tools, it doesn’t include everything you need when you work on cars like I do. For one thing, it came with no impact sockets. For those I tried out a set of impact sockets form Harbor Freight. I’ve had them for about 20 years, and they are still going. I never had a problem with any of them, and at that low price, I consider it one of the best investments I’ve made.

 Years later pneumatic impact wrenches have gotten a lot more powerful. I bought a 500 ft/lb Earthquake impact wrench from Harbor freight. I’ve tested it against some leading brands, and it holds its own. Those impact sockets from Harbor Freight had not reached their limit with that impact wrench, or the extra long breaker bar I bought from Harbor Freight. Did I mention, hand tools from Harbor Freight come with a life time warranty? I’ve only had to use that once with a Phillips screwdriver that met its match on an old, 1961 car that has seen better days. Just take the tool in for a replacement. No questions asked. The same is true with Sears and their Craftsman tools.

I know a lot of people like to stick to their Snap-on tools. They spend a ton of money for their tools because they depend on them for a living. They have Snap-on everything. The thing about Snap[-on is, when there is a need to a new tool, Snap-on is typically the first one to come out with it. They also have sales people who come to your door, sell out of their truck, and keep you up to date on the new tools.

I want to keep this article rather short, so I will concentrate on hand tools here, and branch out on other types of tools on other articles. I can’t stress the quality of tools enough, and there are a number of companies offering good tools at a fair price. Stanley used to be another dependable name. We already covered sockets, and wrenches. I have not tried the Harbor Freight 12 point sockets, but their 6 point impact sockets are a good buy and have lasted me years. I own 6 point impact sockets in a number of sets. ½ inch drive deep sockets in inch and metric. 3/8 inch drive standard depth inch sockets. I plan on picking up a few other sets from Harbor Freight when they go on sale. I prefer my Craftsman wrenches. I have a set of combination and box wrenches that have went through a lot without a single failure. I also have a set of Craftsman combination wrenches in metric. My socket sets from Craftsman are 12 point standard length inch and metric. Also inch and metric 6 point deep sockets with standard walls. Out of all those sockets, I’ve only had one failure. I mostly use Craftsman socket wrenches. I wore out a few 3/8 inch drive sockets. Either the little ball that holds the sockets in place wears out, or the teeth inside the wrench wear. No problem, just take them back for a replacement. I’ve found out it is a good idea to oil the top and bottom of the wrench head every once in a while. Especially the little ball that holds the sockets in place. Just put on a little drop of oil, let it soak in for a minute, and wipe off the excess.

There are also ratcheting wrenches. I own an old set of Craftsman socketing wrenches. They come in handy when you need them, but that is not too often. Now stores offer offset and swivel head ratcheting head wrenches. I am looking for a set that has one size on one side, and the next size on the other side. That way you get more sizes. And why buy a ratcheting wrench set with an open end on one side and the ratcheting 12 point on the other side?

Locking pliers are another hand tool everyone will eventually need. I prefer the original Vice-Grip brand for short jaws, and will go to a cheaper brand when it comes to other, long reach, or clamping pliers. You will eventually round the corners on a bolt or nut, you will need a good Vice-Grip pliers to save the day. That is when you need a strong, well built pliers to do the job. I’ve compared Vice-Grip pliers to others and found the Vice-Grip pliers have larger rivets, and are typically less sloppy. I have never had problems with Vice-Grip pliers, but the cheaper brands I use for clamping can be a little wobbly, and less secure. I use different clamping pliers to clamp sheet metal and wood. Cheaper brands are good when you don’t need a lot of clamping pressure, but can twist more than a Vice-Grip clamp if you really need to bear down.

Specialty tools are available from all kinds of sources. These days we have the Internet, and some guy out there made a video on just about everything concerning cars and trucks. You can find answers on the Internet for just about every car problem, and videos that show you how to fix pert near everything. And these days, a lot of those repairs require a specialty tool or two. When that situation comes up, I ask around to see if anyone has bought the specialty tool. If they did, I borrow it. Guys know how to network, and share. Or at least they should. Otherwise I search the Internet or Amazon to see who has the best deal. By the best deal I mean, a quality tool at the best price. I just happened to run across an add-on for my Chromium browser called Honey. I thought it was a joke, spam, or some kind of scam. Honey developed a system that is supposed to search the site you are on like Amazon, Walmart, and other sites like that to find the best deal. I’m not sure Honey works. It keeps telling me the products I have on my lists in Amazon are the best price. I’ll have to test it some more and write another article on it.

 

I figure Honey is in the collect and sell information business. They collect your shopping habits so search engines can put ads focusing on what you are shopping for. I’m not sure Honey goes much deeper than that, but you never know. I hope they don’t collect passwords and such. I bank on line.

I have a collection of old tools like a special grip screwdriver for those little distributor screw that hold points in. And other old tools this younger generation has not seen. Those make for an interesting conversation on some days when you are talking tools.

I did buy a few cheaper sets of screwdrivers . Once again, I prefer my Craftsman tools. But Harbor Freight does have some tempting buys. I bought an older set with black handles and magnetic tips screwdrivers I keep in the basement. That saves a lot of running out to the garage for a tool. The black handle set is made to look like Snap-on screwdrivers, but are not as good. The set from Harbor Freight is good for around the house, and car work. They were a little more expensive, but worth the money. The less expensive Harbor Freight screwdriver set has red handles, is under $10, and has good tips. Like I mentioned earlier, I broke a Phillips tip, and Harbor Freight replaced it free. The thing is, we need a good set of tools for the garage, but should consider discount tools that cost less for inside the house, or in the trunk of the car. Or to loan the discount tools to the neighbor who is always over borrowing things. I’ll update this later on a few other hand tools.

When you shop Harbor Freight, look at the on line ads. Check the sales, and look for that 20% and 25% OFF coupon they put out from time to time. You’ll need it. Wait for the extra tools you need to go on sale. I will be adding articles on electric power tools and pneumatic tools I bought and used.

As usual, I have to mention, Sears, Craftsman, Binks, Harbor Freight, Earthquake, Snap-on, Honey, Amazon, Vice-Grip, and all the other names I mentioned here are Registered Trade names. If anyone considers the use of their name or pictures an infringement of their copy rights, contact me through the DCMA Notice page, and I will remove them.

 

Some people are afraid to buy discount tools, thinking they are cheap, will not last, and will break at the worst time. I’m sure other people had that experience. Buy a discount tool socket set that looks nice in the case, but the socket shattered the first time you use it. That was a cheap tool. But there are other options, and some of them may surprise you.

I use a lot of tools to do a variety of jobs. I’ve fixed or replaced just about every part on a car, and restored a number of cars. I own a lot of quality tools, and at times, it does not pay to skimp on tools that really matter. I used to custom paint cars and would not give up my Binks spray guns for anything. I’ve used other brands for primer guns, but they were also top quality like Devilbiss. On the other hand, I did buy a cheap $15 touch up, or jam gun that was as good as my Binks Model 115 touch up gun. Then there is always painting under the car, like the frame where a cheaper spray gun would be fine. But to paint a custom car, would you spray a hood with nothing less than a top quality spray gun?

Then there are hand tools like sockets, wrenches, and other associated tools. I’ve been rather lucky with some off brands. One of my favorite places to shop is Harbor Freight. More on them later.

My first set of hand tools was a Craftsman set from Sears. They were good quality tools. I’ve owned them over 30 years. My dad owned Craftsmen tools. My brothers bought Craftsman tools from Sears. They are all still reliable. All together, we have not had to return more than a half dozen tools on their life time warranty. That is pretty good.

Although the Craftsman tool set I purchased 30 years ago is a fairly complete set of hand tools, it doesn’t include everything you need when you work on cars like I do. For one thing, it came with no impact sockets. For those I tried out a set of impact sockets form Harbor Freight. I’ve had them for about 20 years, and they are still going. I never had a problem with any of them, and at that low price, I consider it one of the best investments I’ve made.

 Years later pneumatic impact wrenches have gotten a lot more powerful. I bought a 500 ft/lb Earthquake impact wrench from Harbor freight. I’ve tested it against some leading brands, and it holds its own. Those impact sockets from Harbor Freight had not reached their limit with that impact wrench, or the extra long breaker bar I bought from Harbor Freight. Did I mention, hand tools from Harbor Freight come with a life time warranty? I’ve only had to use that once with a Phillips screwdriver that met its match on an old, 1961 car that has seen better days. Just take the tool in for a replacement. No questions asked. The same is true with Sears and their Craftsman tools.

I know a lot of people like to stick to their Snap-on tools. They spend a ton of money for their tools because they depend on them for a living. They have Snap-on everything. The thing about Snap[-on is, when there is a need to a new tool, Snap-on is typically the first one to come out with it. They also have sales people who come to your door, sell out of their truck, and keep you up to date on the new tools.

I want to keep this article rather short, so I will concentrate on hand tools here, and branch out on other types of tools on other articles. I can’t stress the quality of tools enough, and there are a number of companies offering good tools at a fair price. Stanley used to be another dependable name. We already covered sockets, and wrenches. I have not tried the Harbor Freight 12 point sockets, but their 6 point impact sockets are a good buy and have lasted me years. I own 6 point impact sockets in a number of sets. ½ inch drive deep sockets in inch and metric. 3/8 inch drive standard depth inch sockets. I plan on picking up a few other sets from Harbor Freight when they go on sale. I prefer my Craftsman wrenches. I have a set of combination and box wrenches that have went through a lot without a single failure. I also have a set of Craftsman combination wrenches in metric. My socket sets from Craftsman are 12 point standard length inch and metric. Also inch and metric 6 point deep sockets with standard walls. Out of all those sockets, I’ve only had one failure. I mostly use Craftsman socket wrenches. I wore out a few 3/8 inch drive sockets. Either the little ball that holds the sockets in place wears out, or the teeth inside the wrench wear. No problem, just take them back for a replacement. I’ve found out it is a good idea to oil the top and bottom of the wrench head every once in a while. Especially the little ball that holds the sockets in place. Just put on a little drop of oil, let it soak in for a minute, and wipe off the excess.

There are also ratcheting wrenches. I own an old set of Craftsman socketing wrenches. They come in handy when you need them, but that is not too often. Now stores offer offset and swivel head ratcheting head wrenches. I am looking for a set that has one size on one side, and the next size on the other side. That way you get more sizes. And why buy a ratcheting wrench set with an open end on one side and the ratcheting 12 point on the other side?

Locking pliers are another hand tool everyone will eventually need. I prefer the original Vice-Grip brand for short jaws, and will go to a cheaper brand when it comes to other, long reach, or clamping pliers. You will eventually round the corners on a bolt or nut, you will need a good Vice-Grip pliers to save the day. That is when you need a strong, well built pliers to do the job. I’ve compared Vice-Grip pliers to others and found the Vice-Grip pliers have larger rivets, and are typically less sloppy. I have never had problems with Vice-Grip pliers, but the cheaper brands I use for clamping can be a little wobbly, and less secure. I use different clamping pliers to clamp sheet metal and wood. Cheaper brands are good when you don’t need a lot of clamping pressure, but can twist more than a Vice-Grip clamp if you really need to bear down.

Specialty tools are available from all kinds of sources. These days we have the Internet, and some guy out there made a video on just about everything concerning cars and trucks. You can find answers on the Internet for just about every car problem, and videos that show you how to fix pert near everything. And these days, a lot of those repairs require a specialty tool or two. When that situation comes up, I ask around to see if anyone has bought the specialty tool. If they did, I borrow it. Guys know how to network, and share. Or at least they should. Otherwise I search the Internet or Amazon to see who has the best deal. By the best deal I mean, a quality tool at the best price. I just happened to run across an add-on for my Chromium browser called Honey. I thought it was a joke, spam, or some kind of scam. Honey developed a system that is supposed to search the site you are on like Amazon, Walmart, and other sites like that to find the best deal. I’m not sure Honey works. It keeps telling me the products I have on my lists in Amazon are the best price. I’ll have to test it some more and write another article on it.

 

I figure Honey is in the collect and sell information business. They collect your shopping habits so search engines can put ads focusing on what you are shopping for. I’m not sure Honey goes much deeper than that, but you never know. I hope they don’t collect passwords and such. I bank on line.

I have a collection of old tools like a special grip screwdriver for those little distributor screw that hold points in. And other old tools this younger generation has not seen. Those make for an interesting conversation on some days when you are talking tools.

I did buy a few cheaper sets of screwdrivers . Once again, I prefer my Craftsman tools. But Harbor Freight does have some tempting buys. I bought an older set with black handles and magnetic tips screwdrivers I keep in the basement. That saves a lot of running out to the garage for a tool. The black handle set is made to look like Snap-on screwdrivers, but are not as good. The set from Harbor Freight is good for around the house, and car work. They were a little more expensive, but worth the money. The less expensive Harbor Freight screwdriver set has red handles, is under $10, and has good tips. Like I mentioned earlier, I broke a Phillips tip, and Harbor Freight replaced it free. The thing is, we need a good set of tools for the garage, but should consider discount tools that cost less for inside the house, or in the trunk of the car. Or to loan the discount tools to the neighbor who is always over borrowing things. I’ll update this later on a few other hand tools.

When you shop Harbor Freight, look at the on line ads. Check the sales, and look for that 20% and 25% OFF coupon they put out from time to time. You’ll need it. Wait for the extra tools you need to go on sale. I will be adding articles on electric power tools and pneumatic tools I bought and used.

As usual, I have to mention, Sears, Craftsman, Binks, Harbor Freight, Earthquake, Snap-on, Honey, Amazon, Vice-Grip, and all the other names I mentioned here are Registered Trade names. If anyone considers the use of their name or pictures an infringement of their copy rights, contact me through the DCMA Notice page, and I will remove them.